June272011
On My fifth grade report card, my teacher wrote that I was ‘over-exuberant.’  She said that I didn’t understand traditional boundaries, and that I needed to realize that I “cannot always do what I want, when I want.”  She skimmed over the fact that I had straight As and wrote an entire paragraph which chastised my high energy levels and my constant need for stimulation. 
As I’ve grown older, much of my childhood has started to fade and melt into one blurry and incoherent memory, but I will never forget the day I received that report card.  I did not know the meaning of ‘exuberance’ so I found a dictionary and looked it up.  I was mortified that somebody thought these things of me, and I started to constantly question my behavior and personality, hoping that I was not being too ‘over-exuberant.’ 
These last few weeks before my move to California have inevitably presented me with the opportunity to sort though the artifacts of my childhood.  Just last night, my mother and I were sitting on the living room floor together, scraping together the move important remnants while trying to purge ourselves of the others.  We came across my fifth grade report card.  She didn’t recall that particular document with the clarity that I did, so she reread it and decided that she didn’t like it either.  We ripped it up together and threw it away.
I woke up this morning, my last morning in Massachusetts, not knowing where to begin.  I meandered into the kitchen where my mom was performing her daily ritual of coffee/english muffin/raspberry jam.  I opened up the computer and printed my boarding passes.  We cried.
"I’ve been thinking a lot about that report card, and I feel really bad that I didn’t deal with it better," she said.  "Everybody has always been trying to restrain you."
Well, here I go. 

On My fifth grade report card, my teacher wrote that I was ‘over-exuberant.’  She said that I didn’t understand traditional boundaries, and that I needed to realize that I “cannot always do what I want, when I want.”  She skimmed over the fact that I had straight As and wrote an entire paragraph which chastised my high energy levels and my constant need for stimulation. 

As I’ve grown older, much of my childhood has started to fade and melt into one blurry and incoherent memory, but I will never forget the day I received that report card.  I did not know the meaning of ‘exuberance’ so I found a dictionary and looked it up.  I was mortified that somebody thought these things of me, and I started to constantly question my behavior and personality, hoping that I was not being too ‘over-exuberant.’ 

These last few weeks before my move to California have inevitably presented me with the opportunity to sort though the artifacts of my childhood.  Just last night, my mother and I were sitting on the living room floor together, scraping together the move important remnants while trying to purge ourselves of the others.  We came across my fifth grade report card.  She didn’t recall that particular document with the clarity that I did, so she reread it and decided that she didn’t like it either.  We ripped it up together and threw it away.

I woke up this morning, my last morning in Massachusetts, not knowing where to begin.  I meandered into the kitchen where my mom was performing her daily ritual of coffee/english muffin/raspberry jam.  I opened up the computer and printed my boarding passes.  We cried.

"I’ve been thinking a lot about that report card, and I feel really bad that I didn’t deal with it better," she said.  "Everybody has always been trying to restrain you."

Well, here I go. 

April192011
March152011

The Power of Words

In 1963, Kenya adopted the concept of ‘HARAMBEE’, literally meaning ‘pull together’.  Through this philosophy, the people of Kenya have managed to overcome political strife and differences between varying cultures, religions or other dividing groups in Kenya.  Through this word, HARAMBEE, Kenya has set an example for other nations who are superficially divided among cultural lines.  HARAMBEE reaches to the root of it all.   That root is simple to define:  WE ARE ALL HUMAN.  Reach out, help one another, drop the poisonous facades that divide us and veil us from loving one another simply for being human.  Good job, Kenya, and thank you for showing us the Power of Words. 

March102011
h.e.l.l.y.e.s.   $4.

h.e.l.l.y.e.s. $4.

March92011
New whip.
Summer is approaching……..

New whip.

Summer is approaching……..

March72011

me-ow

approach with caution and offer tea

8AM
“Kitchen Confidential” starring JOE as COUSIN IT

“Kitchen Confidential” starring JOE as COUSIN IT

March52011

This video is the trailer for “A Long Haul”, which is a documentary about the boat that my friend Curt worked on for so many years.  Curt passed away unexpectedly from a blood clot in February.  I’m so glad that this was made before he died so that his children can have such awesome evidence of their wonderful dad. 

side note:  he is the one who says “custom carpentry at sea.”

February272011

Leo = Footwarmer

February242011

week off of work = lots of hooping

song = ‘Noctuary’ by Bonobo

life = good

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